tirempl

Path loss using Terrain Integrated Rough Earth Model (TIREM)

Description

example

pl = tirempl(r,z,f) returns the path loss in dB for a signal with frequency f when it is propagated over terrain. You can specify terrain using numeric vectors for distance r and elevation z along the great circle path between the transmitter and the receiver. The Terrain Integrated Rough Earth Model™ (TIREM™) model combines physics with empirical data to provide path loss estimates. The TIREM model is valid from 1 MHz to 1000 GHz.

Note

tirempl requires access to the external TIREM library. Use tiremSetup to set up access.

pl = tirempl(r,z,f,Name,Value) returns the path loss in dB with additional options specified by name-value pairs.

[pl,output] = tirempl(___) returns the path loss, pl, and the output structure containing the information on the TIREM analysis.

Examples

Path Loss Over Flat Terrain

Calculate the path loss over flat terrain. Define the terrain profile for distances up to 10 km with step size of 100 m.

freq = 28e9;
r = 0:100:10000;
z = zeros(1,numel(r));
    Lterrain1 = tirempl(r,z,freq,...
       'TransmitterAntennaHeight',5, ...
       'ReceiverAntennaHeight',5)
Lterrain1 =

  142.6089

Input Arguments

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Distances along the great circle path between the transmitter and the receiver, specified as a numeric vector with each value in meters. The number of distance values must be equal to the number of elevation values.

Data Types: double

Elevation values corresponding to the distance values along the great circle path between the transmitter and the receiver, specified as a numeric vector with each value in meters. The number of elevation values must be equal to the number of distance values.

Data Types: double

Frequency of the propagated signal, specified as a scalar or numeric vector with each element unit in Hz.

Data Types: double

Name-Value Pair Arguments

Specify optional comma-separated pairs of Name,Value arguments. Name is the argument name and Value is the corresponding value. Name must appear inside quotes. You can specify several name and value pair arguments in any order as Name1,Value1,...,NameN,ValueN.

Example: 'TransmitterAntennaHeight',50

Transmitter antenna height above the ground, specified as a numeric scalar in the range of 0 to 30000. The height is measured from ground elevation to the center of the antenna.

Data Types: double

Receiver antenna height above the ground, specified as a numeric scalar in the range of 0 to 30000. The height is measured from ground elevation to the center of the antenna.

Data Types: double

Polarization of the transmitter and the receiver antennas, specified as 'horizontal' or 'vertical'.

Data Types: string | char

Conductivity of the ground, specified as a numeric scalar in the range of 0.00005 to 100 in Siemens per meter. This value is used to calculate the path loss due to ground reflection. The default value corresponds to the average ground conductivity.

Data Types: double

Relative permittivity of the ground, specified as a numeric scalar in the range of 1 to100. Relative permittivity is the ratio of absolute material permittivity to the permittivity of vacuum. This value is used to calculate the path loss due to ground reflection. The default value corresponds to the average ground permittivity.

Data Types: double

Atmospheric refractivity near the ground, specified as a numeric scalar in N-units in the range of 250 to 400. This value is used to calculate the path loss due to atmospheric refraction and tropospheric scatter. The default value corresponds to average atmospheric conditions.

Data Types: double

Absolute air humidity near the ground, specified as a numeric scalar in g/m^3 in the range of 50 to 110. This value is used to calculate path loss due to atmospheric absorption. The default value corresponds to the absolute humidity of air at 15 degrees Celsius and 70 percent relative humidity.

Data Types: double

Output Arguments

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Path loss, returned as a scalar or 1-by-N vector with each element unit in decibels. N is the number of frequencies defined in the input f.

Path loss is calculated from free-space loss, terrain diffraction, ground reflection, refraction through the atmosphere, tropospheric scatter, and atmospheric absorption.

Information of TIREM analysis, returned as a structure. Each field of the structure represents an output from TIREM analysis.

Introduced in R2019b